Intensive correction orders (ICOs) (alternative to full-time imprisonment)

[3-600] Introduction

Section 7(1) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999 provides that a court that has sentenced an offender to imprisonment in respect of one or more offences may make an intensive correction order (ICO) directing that the sentence be served by way of intensive correction in the community.

Part 5 Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act sets out the sentencing procedures governing ICOs. The Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Amendment (Sentencing Options) Act 2017, which commenced on 24 September 2018, restructured and amended the provisions relating to ICOs.

The changes made allow offenders to access intensive supervision as an alternative to a short prison sentence and “help courts ensure that offenders address their offending behaviour and are held accountable”: Attorney General (NSW), the Hon M Speakman SC, Second Reading Speech for the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Amendment (Sentencing Options) Bill and cognate legislation, NSW, Legislative Assembly, Debates, 11 October 2017, p 2.

A feature of the new Pt 5 is that community safety is the paramount consideration when determining whether to make an ICO because, the Attorney General said, at p 2, “community safety is not just about incarceration” and “community supervision and programs are far more effective” at reducing re-offending.

The provisions in Pt 5 also:

  • give the court more discretion to tailor the particular conditions to be imposed on the ICO to the individual offender

  • require that an ICO be subject to two standard conditions and at least one additional condition (which may include home detention)

  • further restrict the offences for which an ICO can be made.

ICOs made before 24 September 2018 continue in operation but with revised conditions.

Home detention orders made before 24 September 2018 are taken to be ICOs subject to standard ICO conditions and a home detention condition. See ICOs and home detention orders made before 24 September 2018 at [3-690].

[3-610] Power to make ICO subject to Pt 5

See also [3-300] Penalties of imprisonment.

A court that has sentenced an offender to imprisonment in respect of one or more offences may make an ICO directing that the sentence be served by way of intensive correction in the community: s 7(1) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999. If such an order is made, the court must not set a non-parole period for the sentence: s 7(2).

Although s 7(1) is expressed in the past tense, “[a] court that has sentenced”, s 7(4) makes it clear that the power under s 7(1) is “subject to the provisions of Part 5” of the Act. Part 5 is headed “Sentencing procedures for intensive correction orders” and applies when “a court is considering, or has made, an intensive correction order”: s 64. [Emphasis added.]

[3-620] Restrictions on power to make ICO

Part 5, Division 2 Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999 sets out specific restrictions on the power to make an ICO.

ICO not available for certain offences

Section 67(1) provides that an ICO must not be made in respect of a sentence of imprisonment for:

(a) 

murder or manslaughter

(b) 

a prescribed sexual offence

(c) 

a terrorism offence within the meaning of the Crimes Act 1914 (Cth) or under s 310J Crimes Act 1900

(d) 

an offence relating to a contravention of a serious crime prevention order under s 8 Crimes (Serious Crime Prevention Orders) Act 2016

(e) 

an offence relating to a contravention of a public safety order under s 87ZA Law Enforcement (Powers and Responsibilities) Act 2002

(f) 

an offence involving the discharge of a firearm

(g) 

an offence that includes the commission of, or an intention to commit, an offence referred to in paragraphs (a)–(f)

(h) 

an offence of attempting, or of conspiracy or incitement, to commit an offence referred to in paragraphs (a)–(g).

“Prescribed sexual offence” is defined in s 67(2) and encompasses a range of offences including offences under Pt 3, Divs 10–10A Crimes Act where the victim is under 16 years or the offence involves sexual intercourse and the victim is of any age; child prostitution; voyeurism offences where the victim is a child; State and Commonwealth child abuse material and child pornography offences; offences of trafficking children and procuring children for sexual activity under the Criminal Code (Cth) and some repealed offences under the Crimes Act 1914 (Cth).

Nor can an ICO be made with respect to an aggregate sentence of imprisonment in relation to two or more offences, where any one of the offences is an offence listed in s 67(1): s 67(3).

ICOs and domestic violence offences

An ICO must not be made in respect of a sentence of imprisonment for a domestic violence offence, or an aggregate sentence of imprisonment where any one or more of the offences is a domestic violence offence, unless the court is satisfied the victim of the domestic violence offence, and any person with whom the offender is likely to reside, will be adequately protected: s 4B(1). If the court finds a person guilty of a domestic violence offence, the court must not impose a home detention condition if the court reasonably believes the offender will reside with the victim of the domestic violence offence: s 4B(2).

ICOs not available for juvenile offenders

An ICO may not be made with respect to offenders under the age of 18 years: s 7(3).

ICOs not available where imprisonment exceeds limits

An ICO must not be made in respect of a single offence if the duration of the term of imprisonment for the offence exceeds 2 years: s 68(1). An ICO may be made in respect of an aggregate sentence of imprisonment, however the aggregate term must not exceed 3 years: s 68(2). Two or more ICOs may be made for two or more offences but the duration of any individual term of imprisonment must not exceed 2 years, and the duration of the term of imprisonment for all offences must not exceed 3 years: s 68(3); see R v Fangaloka [2019] NSWCCA 173 at [51].

A court cannot manipulate pre-sentence custody to bring a sentence within the jurisdictional ceiling for the imposition of an ICO: R v West [2014] NSWCCA 250.

ICOs not available for offenders residing in other jurisdictions

The court may not make an ICO in respect of an offender who resides, or intends to reside, in another State or Territory, unless the regulations declare that State or Territory to be an approved jurisdiction: s 69(3). No State or Territory is currently declared to be an approved jurisdiction.

[3-630] ICO is a form of imprisonment

An ICO is a “custodial sentence” referred to in Pt 2, Div 2 Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999. Since it is a form of imprisonment, making an ICO requires a sentencing court to follow a three stage process before directing that the sentence can be served in that way: R v Fangaloka [2019] NSWCCA 173 at [44].

First, the court must be satisfied that, having considered all possible alternatives, no penalty other than imprisonment is appropriate: s 5(1) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act; R v Douar (2005) 159 A Crim R 154 at [70]; R v Hamieh [2010] NSWCCA 189 at [76].

Second, if a sentence of imprisonment is appropriate, the court determines the length of sentence without regard to how it is to be served: R v Douar at [71]; R v Zamagias [2002] NSWCCA 17 at [26]; Zreika v R (2012) 223 A Crim R 460 at [56]. It is preferable for the court to articulate its conclusion as to the appropriate term: R v Assaad [2009] NSWCCA 182 at [33]. It is inappropriate to consider how the sentence will be served before determining its length: R v Ryan (2006) 167 A Crim R 241 at [1], [4].

The court must then consider whether any alternative to full-time imprisonment should be imposed: R v Zamagias at [28]; R v Foster [2001] NSWCCA 215 at [30]; Campbell v R [2018] NSWCCA 87 at [47], [52]. The appropriateness of an alternative option depends on various factors, including whether such an alternative results in a sentence that reflects the objective seriousness of the offence and fulfils the purposes of punishment. Sight should not be lost of the fact that the more lenient the alternative the less likely it will do so: R v Zamagias at [28]; R v Hamieh at [76]; R v Douar at [72]. It is preferable to make clear that such alternatives have been considered and, if necessary, explain why they are not appropriate, although a failure to do so is not erroneous: Casella v R [2019] NSWCCA 201 at [63]–[65]; see also Campbell v R [2018] NSWCCA 87 at [53].

The third step of considering whether an alternative to full-time imprisonment should be imposed does not equate to an express obligation to consider whether it is appropriate that the sentence be served by way of an ICO. Neither s 7 nor Pt 5 of the Act should be construed as obliging the court to consider whether it is appropriate that a sentence of less than 2 years be served by way of an ICO: R v Fangaloka at [60]-[61]. In R v Fangaloka at [60], Basten JA (Johnson and Price JJ agreeing) addressed the broader implications of such an approach observing that:

If there were such an obligation, the Local Court (where the power to impose imprisonment for an individual offence is limited to 2 years) would be required to consider imposing a sentence by way of ICO in every case in which imprisonment was appropriate.

However, the power to consider imposing an ICO invites a further question concerning the basis upon which a court should decline to consider imposing one. Relevant to this is the need for adequate punishment, general deterrence, denunciation or for recognising the harm done to the victim and the community. Of these, Basten JA said, at [61]:

… it would be strange if those broader considerations were reduced to a subordinate role immediately the court gave consideration to making an ICO. Such a conclusion would achieve a high degree of inflexibility and artificiality in the process of sentencing.

ICOs available for sentences of 6 months or less

Nothing in s 5(2) or Pt 5 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999 precludes imposing an ICO for a sentence of 6 months: Casella v R [2019] NSWCCA 201 at [105]; [110]. In Casella v R, the applicant’s appeal was allowed and he was re-sentenced to 6 months imprisonment which the court directed was to be served by way of an ICO. Beech-Jones J, who discussed aspects of the court’s decision in R v Fangaloka, and with whom the Chief Justice and N Adams J agreed, concluded that the statement in R v Fangaloka [2019] NSWCCA 173 at [56] that “in practice, Pt 5 is unlikely to be applied to very short sentences (for 6 months or a lesser period)” should not be regarded as having any binding effect on either the CCA or lower courts as this issue was not essential to the outcome in that case.

Inherently lenient or a substantial punishment?

An ICO has the capacity to operate as substantial punishment, but can also reflect a significant degree of leniency because it does not involve immediate incarceration: R v Pullen [2018] NSWCCA 264 at [53]; R v Pogson [2012] NSWCCA 225 at [108]; Whelan v R (2012) 228 A Crim R 1 at [120]; see also R v  Fangaloka at [67].

In R v Pullen the court concluded that ICO’s under the new scheme still involved substantial punishment given the multiple mandatory obligations attached to the standard conditions (see Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Regulation 2014, cll 186, 187 and 189) and that the degree of punishment involved, and its appropriateness in a particular case, should be assessed having regard to the number and nature of conditions imposed. In some cases, an ICO could be more onerous because of the significant number of obligations prescribed by the regulations: R v Pullen at [66].

In R v Fangaloka, the court, when discussing the effect of the competing purposes of sentencing on the consideration of whether a sentence of imprisonment should be served in custody or by way of an ICO, observed at [67];

there will remain cases in which the significant element of leniency contained in an ICO is inconsistent with the imposition of an adequate penalty, so that an ICO is an unacceptable form of imprisonment.

[3-632] Community safety paramount consideration

When determining whether to make an ICO, community safety must be the court’s paramount consideration: s 66(1) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999.

When considering community safety, the court must assess whether making the order or serving the sentence by way of full-time detention is more likely to address the offender’s risk of re-offending: s 66(2). This requirement recognises that community safety is not achieved simply by incarcerating an offender, but that incarceration may have the opposite effect; the concept of community safety is linked with considerations of rehabilitation, which is more likely to occur with supervision and access to programs in the community: R v Pullen [2018] NSWCCA 264 at [84]. However, while community safety can operate in different ways in different circumstances, the purpose of s 66 is “merely to ensure that the court does not assume that full time detention is more likely to address a risk of reoffending than a community-based program of supervised activity”: R v Fangaloka [2019] NSWCCA 173 at [66]. See also R v Boughen (2012) 215 A Crim R 476 at [109]–[111]; R v Agius [2012] NSWSC 978 at [103]–[116], although these were decided under the previous legislative scheme.

Evidence to assist in determining an offender’s risk of re-offending may be contained in an assessment report as the regulations require that this be addressed: cl 12A(1)(a) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Regulation 2017. However, subject to certain qualifications, not presently relevant, the court is not bound by the assessment report: s 69(2).

The court must also consider the purposes of sentencing in s 3A Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act, any relevant common law principles and any other matters: s 66(3). Whether or not s 66(1) has primacy over the purposes of sentencing in s 3A was first considered by the Court of Criminal Appeal in R v Pullen and again in R v Fangaloka.

In R v Fangaloka the court (Basten JA; Johnson and Price JJ agreeing) took a more restrictive approach to the construction of s 66 than was taken in R v Pullen. Importantly, Johnson J at [77], who was also a member of the Bench in R v Pullen specifically agreed with the approach to the construction of s 66 taken by Basten JA. So too, at [78], did Price J.

The court found that the paramount consideration in considering whether to make an ICO is whether such an order, or full-time detention, would be more likely to address the offender’s risk of reoffending. Unless a favourable opinion is reached as to that question, an ICO should not be imposed: R v Fangaloka at [63]; Casella v R at [102]; [108]; [111].

The court concluded that while s 66 specifically required a sentencing court to consider the likelihood of a particular form of order addressing the offender’s risk of re-offending, that obligation (found in s 66(2)) was not in derogation of either the purposes of sentencing in s 3A or other relevant matters — all must be considered and given due weight: R v Fangaloka at [63], [65]; cf R v Pullen at [86].

[3-635] ICO assessment reports

In deciding whether or not to make an ICO, the court is to have regard to the contents of an assessment report and such evidence from a community corrections officer as the court considers necessary: s 69(1) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999.

The relevant statutory requirements for assessment reports are contained Pt 2, Div 4B (ss 17B–17D) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act.

An assessment report may be requested:

  • after an offender has been found guilty and before imposing sentence: s 17C(1)(b)(i)

  • during sentencing proceedings after a sentence of imprisonment has been imposed: s 17C(1)(b)(ii)

  • during proceedings to correct a sentencing error: s 17C(1)(b)(iv).

A court must not:

  • make an ICO unless it has obtained a relevant assessment report in relation to the offender (although it is not required to obtain an assessment report if satisfied there is sufficient information before it to justify making the ICO): s 17D(1), s 17D(1A)

  • impose a home detention or community service work condition on an ICO unless it has obtained an assessment report relating to the imposition of such a condition: s 17D(2), 17D(4)

  • request an assessment report concerning the imposition of a home detention condition unless it has imposed a sentence of imprisonment on the offender for a specified term: s 17D(3).

The court is not bound by the assessment report except in the circumstances identified in s 73A(3): s 69(2). Section 73A(3) provides that a court must not impose a home detention condition or community service work condition on an ICO unless an assessment report states the offender is suitable.

A court may form the view that an ICO is not appropriate where a report indicates the offender will be unable to comply with the conditions of an ICO or if he or she is likely to breach the conditions: R v Zreika (2012) 223 A Crim R 460 at [67].

For the matters the assessment report must address, see Requirements for assessment reports at [3-510].

[3-640] ICO conditions

ICO conditions are imposed by the court under Pt 5, Div 4 Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999, and may be imposed, varied or revoked by the Parole Authority or, in some circumstances, Community Corrections: Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999, ss 81, 81A, 164.

An ICO is subject to:

  • standard conditions (s 72(3) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act)

  • additional conditions (s 73A)

  • any further conditions imposed by the court (s 73B)

  • any conditions imposed by the Parole Authority under ss 81A or 164 Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999.

The court must, at the time of sentence, impose on the ICO the standard conditions, at least one additional condition and may impose further conditions: s 73.

Range of conditions

Standard conditions

The court must, at the time of sentence, impose on an ICO the standard ICO conditions, which are that the offender must not commit any offence and must submit to supervision by a community corrections officer: s 73(1), 73(2).

Additional conditions

In addition to the standard conditions, the court must, at the time of sentence, impose at least one of the additional conditions referred to in s 73A(2), unless satisfied there are exceptional circumstances: s 73A(1A). In Casella v R [2019] NSWCCA 201, the fact that the applicant had been on conditional bail while his appeal was pending was found to be an exceptional circumstance for the purposes of s 73A: at [100]. The additional conditions available include:

(a) 

home detention

(b) 

electronic monitoring

(c) 

a curfew

(d) 

community service work requiring the performance of community service work for a specified number of hours

(e) 

a rehabilitation or treatment condition requiring the offender to participate in a rehabilitation program or to receive treatment

(f) 

abstention from alcohol or drugs or both

(g) 

a non-association condition prohibiting association with particular persons

(h) 

a place restriction condition prohibiting the frequenting of or visits to a particular place or area.

If the court determines not to impose an additional condition, it must record its reasons for doing so, however, the failure to record reasons does not invalidate the sentence: s 73A(1B).

The court must not impose a home detention or community service work condition on an ICO unless an assessment report states the offender is suitable to be the subject of such a condition: s 73A(3). The court may limit the period during which an additional condition is in force: s 73A(4).

Maximum hours and minimum periods for community service work

The maximum number of hours that may be specified for community service work in an additional condition of an ICO are set out in cl 14(1) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Regulation 2017:

(a) 

100 hours for offences with a maximum term of imprisonment of 6 months or less

(b) 

200 hours for offences with a maximum term of imprisonment exceeding 6 months but not 1 year

(c) 

750 hours for offences with a maximum term of imprisonment exceeding 1 year.

The minimum period that a community service work condition of an ICO must be in force is set out in cl 14(2):

(a) 

6 months if the hours of work do not exceed 100 hours

(b) 

12 months if the hours of work exceed 100 hours but not 300 hours

(c) 

18 months if the hours of work exceed 300 hours but not 500 hours

(d) 

2 years if the hours of work exceed 500 hours.

Further conditions

The court may impose further conditions on an ICO but these must not be inconsistent with any standard or additional conditions (whether or not they are imposed on the particular ICO): s 73B.

Offenders’ obligations under ICO conditions

The obligations of offenders subject to the standard ICO conditions are set out in cll 186, 187 Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Regulation 2014: s 82 Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act. Their specific obligations with respect to home detention, electronic monitoring, curfew, community service work, rehabilitation or treatment, abstention, non-association, and place restriction conditions are set out in cll 189–189G.

Power of Parole Authority and Community Corrections to vary conditions

The Parole Authority may, on application of a community corrections officer or the offender, impose, vary or revoke any conditions of an ICO, including those imposed by the sentencing court: s 81A(1) Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act. However, the Parole Authority must not vary or revoke a standard condition, or impose or vary any other condition unless the sentencing court could have imposed or varied the condition under Pt 5 Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act: s 81A(2). If the Parole Authority revokes an additional condition on an ICO, it must replace it with another additional condition, unless there is already another additional condition in force with respect to the order, or unless there are exceptional circumstances: s 81A(3)–(4).

The Parole Authority must not impose a period of home detention or a condition requiring community service work unless a report from a community corrections officer states that imposing such a condition is appropriate: s 81A(2)(d).

A condition of an ICO relating to supervision, curfew, non-association and place restriction (ss 73(2)(b), 73A(2) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act) may be suspended by a community corrections officer: s 82A. The factors to be taken into account before suspending a supervision condition are found in cl 189I Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Regulation 2014.

An ICO expires at the end of the sentence to which it relates unless it is sooner revoked: s 83.

Care must be exercised in the administration of the conditions. The capacity to direct the offender must be confined to a legitimate purpose in furtherance of the specific court order: R v Pogson [2012] NSWCCA 225 at [101]. For example, requiring an offender to submit to breath testing where the offender is not subject to a court-ordered condition prohibiting the use of alcohol may be beyond power: R v Pogson at [101].

[3-650] Multiple orders

Only one “relevant order” can be in force for an offender at the same time for the same offence: s 17F(1). “Relevant order” is defined as an ICO, CCO or CRO: s 17E. If an offender is subject to multiple orders at the same time, an ICO (and its conditions) prevails over a CCO (and its conditions) and a CCO (and its conditions) prevails over a CRO (and its conditions): s 17F(3),(4). Despite this, a standard condition prevails over a condition that is not standard: s 17F(4)(c). For community service work and curfew conditions under multiple orders, see Multiple orders at [3-520].

[3-660] Pronouncement of ICO by court, terms and commencement

The Local Court is not empowered to make an ICO in the offender’s absence: s 25(1)(b) Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999.

The form of order is that the court pronounces the offender is sentenced to a term of imprisonment for a particular duration and then directs that it be served by way of an ICO. The court must not set a non-parole period: s 7(2). At the time of sentence, the court must impose on the ICO the standard conditions, additional conditions and any further conditions: s 73.

Unless sooner revoked, the term of an ICO is the same as the term of imprisonment in respect of which the order is made: s 70; s 83 Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999.

An ICO commences on the date it was made, unless the ICO is made in relation to a sentence of imprisonment that is to be served consecutively, or partly consecutively, with another sentence of imprisonment the subject of an ICO: s 71.

An offender may not be subject to two or more ICOs to be served concurrently or consecutively (or partly concurrently and partly consecutively) where the date at which the new sentence will end is more than 2 years after the date on which it was imposed: s 68(1).

Explaining the order

The court must ensure that all reasonable steps are taken to explain to the offender the ICO obligations and the consequences of a failure to comply: s 17I(1).

A court must cause written notice of the order to be given to the offender and to Corrective Services as soon as practicable after making an ICO: s 17J(1).

[3-670] Breaches of ICOs

Where the Commissioner of Corrective Services or a community corrections officer is satisfied an offender has failed to comply with his or her obligations under an ICO, a community corrections officer may, pursuant to s 163(2) Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999:

  • record the breach and take no formal action

  • give an informal warning to the offender

  • give a formal warning that further breaches will result in referral to the Parole Authority

  • give a direction about the non-compliant behaviour

  • impose a curfew.

If the breach is more serious, the Commissioner or a community corrections officer can refer the breaches to the Parole Authority: s 163(3). In that case, where the Parole Authority is satisfied an offender has failed to comply with his or her obligations under an ICO (s 164(1)), it may, pursuant to s 164(2):

  • record the breach and take no further action

  • give a formal warning

  • impose any conditions on the ICO

  • vary or revoke the conditions of the ICO, including those imposed by the court

  • revoke the ICO.

Section 164(6) prescribes certain restrictions on the power of the Parole Authority to vary, revoke or impose conditions following the breach of an ICO. They are the same as those applying where the Parole Authority varies, revokes or imposes conditions generally (without a breach) under s 81A: see ICO conditions at [3-640].

Where an ICO is revoked, a warrant is issued for the offender’s arrest and the sentence ceases to run. A revocation order takes effect on the date on which it is made or on such earlier date as the Parole Authority thinks fit: s 164A(1). The earliest date on which the revocation order may take effect is the first occasion on which it appears to the Parole Authority that the offender failed to comply with his or her obligations under the order: s 164A(2). If an offender is not taken into custody until after the day on which the revocation order takes effect, the term of the offender’s sentence is extended by the number of days the person was at large after the order took effect: s 164A(3).

[3-680] Federal offences

Sentencing alternatives under State or Territory law are available to federal offenders if prescribed under s 20AB Crimes Act 1914 (Cth) and/or reg 6 Crimes Regulations 1990 (Cth). The Crimes Amendment Regulations 2010 (No 4) (Cth) amended reg 6 Crimes Regulation 1990 (Cth) to enable an ICO to be imposed for a Commonwealth offence.

Section 20AB provides, inter alia, “such a sentence or order may in corresponding cases be passed or made” [emphasis added]. The question that arises is the extent to which the phrase “corresponding cases” in s 20AB can be read to refer to equivalent State offences.

Neither reg 6 Crimes Regulation nor s 20AB exclude specific offences from an ICO. However, s 67(1) Crimes Sentencing Procedure Act 1999 (NSW) purports to exclude a number of Commonwealth offences from an ICO: see Restrictions on power to make ICO at [3-620].

Section 20AC Crimes Act 1914 addresses the circumstance where a Commonwealth offender has failed to comply with an ICO, made under s 20AB(1).

[3-690] ICOs and home detention orders made before 24 September 2018

Existing ICOs

Existing ICOs made under s 7 Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999 before 24 September 2018 are taken to be an ICO subject to:

  • the standard ICO conditions

  • any conditions imposed under s 81(3) Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999 and in force immediately before 24 September 2018

  • a condition requiring the offender to undertake a minimum of 32 hours of community service work a month as directed by a community corrections officer; and

  • any other conditions prescribed by the regulations: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 72.

The conditions imposed on the ICO by the court under s 81 Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999 as in force before 24 September 2018 cease to apply to the order: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 72(5).

An offender who is subject to a condition requiring 32 hours of community service work a month is subject to the same obligations as prescribed for the purposes of s 82 Crimes (Administration of Sentence) Act for an offender who is subject to a community service work condition of an ICO: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 72(3A).

Sections 163 and 164 Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act (the breach provisions) as in force from 24 September 2018 apply to an ICO in respect of action that may be taken for a breach of the order: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 72(4).

Existing home detention orders

An existing home detention order made under s 6 before 24 September 2018 is taken to be an ICO subject to the following:

  • the standard ICO conditions

  • a home detention condition

  • any conditions imposed under s 103(1)(b) or (c) Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act in force immediately before 24 September 2018

  • any other conditions prescribed by the regulations: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 71.

The ICO operates for the same term as the home detention order: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 71(5). A parole order made in relation to the home detention order ceases to have effect from 24 September 2018 and any period during which the offender would have been subject to a parole order is to be served subject to the standard conditions of the ICO only: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 71(6), (7).

If an assessment report was prepared for an offender for the purposes of former s 78 (suitability for home detention) or s 86 (suitability for community service work) before their repeal, the report is taken to be an assessment report for the purposes of s 17D(2) and (4) and a further report is not required: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 82A(1), (2).

Appeals in respect of converted orders

An appeal with respect to an ICO made before 24 September 2018 is not affected by the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Amendment (Sentencing Options) Act 2017 unless the court hearing the appeal decides to re-sentence the offender, in which case it must do so in accordance with the Act as in force from 24 September 2018: Sch 2, Pt 29, cl 86(2), 86(3).

[3-710] Additional references

  • P Mizzi, “The sentencing reforms — balancing the causes and consequences of offending with community safety” (2018) 30 JOB 73

  • Judicial Commission of NSW, Local Court Bench Book, 1988–, “Intensive correction orders” at [10-220]

  • H Donnelly, “Fitting intensive correction orders within the statutory scheme” (2010) 22 JOB 90.